Borba protiv terorizma u Egiptu

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Borba protiv terorizma u Egiptu

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Морсију време истиче: Morsi Timer



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Go Morsi,go,go Mr. Green



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Hajde da se dogovorimo gde da pišemo vesti iz Egipta , pošto izgleda da će biti veoma zivahno ovih dana .
Ili da otvorimo treću temu , pa tek onda da bude veselo , imamo ovo sa gomilanjem na Sinaju , i temu Bliski Istok , ajde da napišemo novu temu ,,Zagomilalo u Egiptu" .
Stvarno valjalo bi da pišemo na jedno mesto .

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zagomilalo u egiptu hahahaha

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Napisano: 02 Jul 2013 23:09

Zanimljiv članak u NYT.
https://www.mycity.rs/must-login.png

Dopuna: 02 Jul 2013 23:11

Dragan Mačak Damljanović ::Hajde da se dogovorimo gde da pišemo vesti iz Egipta , pošto izgleda da će biti veoma zivahno ovih dana .
Ili da otvorimo treću temu , pa tek onda da bude veselo , imamo ovo sa gomilanjem na Sinaju , i temu Bliski Istok , ajde da napišemo novu temu ,,Zagomilalo u Egiptu" .
Stvarno valjalo bi da pišemo na jedno mesto .


Naka modovi preimenuju ovu da ne šetamo tamo-vamo.

New York Times
July 2, 2013
Morsi Increasingly Isolated as Supporters Come Under Attack
By BEN HUBBARD, DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK and KAREEM FAHIM
CAIRO — President Mohamed Morsi faced deepening isolation and a new outbreak of armed and lethal political violence on Tuesday as protesters massed to call for his ouster, dozens of supporters were hit by birdshot, the clock ticked on a two-day military ultimatum and high-ranking aides abandoned him. At least seven people were reported killed.

Ultraconservative Islamists also joined the opposition’s call for early presidential elections.

For the third consecutive day, anti-Morsi protesters packed Tahrir Square in central Cairo and filled the street in front of the main presidential palace while starting a new sit-in in front of a second palace, where Mr. Morsi has been working since last week. They chanted for the end of his rule of the country one year after he rode to victory as Egypt’s first democratically elected president.

At the same time on Tuesday, reinforcing the sense of impending showdown, thousands of Mr. Morsi’s Islamist supporters demonstrated in the Cairo suburb of Nasr City and in front of Cairo University. Armed assailants firing birdshot wounded at least 40 of them at the university and injured 35 others with rocks, police officials said.

In a second location, a Cairo neighborhood once considered a stronghold of support for the president’s conservative allies, a gunfight erupted as pro-Morsi marchers entered the neighborhood. An angry mob chased them away, and stripped and beat a man presumed to be among the supporters.

The attacks in both places erupted at nightfall, while in Alexandria in the north, 33 people were wounded by pellets in clashes between Mr. Morsi’s opponents and supporters with gunfire from both sides, police officials said.

Foreign Minister Mohamed Kamel Amr resigned, bringing to six the number of ministers to announce their resignations since the outbreak of mass anti-Morsi protests on Sunday, although the prime minister’s office said in a statement that they would continue to carry out their duties. The cabinet spokesman, Alaa al-Hadidi, and two presidential spokesmen also quit, state media reported.

Other state institutions also undermined Mr. Morsi’s grip on the state, with a court ruling ordering the removal of the Morsi-appointed prosecutor general, Talaat Abdallah, and moving to reinstate a prosecutor first appointed by President Hosni Mubarak before his ouster in the Arab Spring euphoria of 2011.

Also on Tuesday, Egypt’s largest ultraconservative Islamist group and its political arm, the Nour party, joined the call for early presidential elections and the formation of a caretaker cabinet. The group did not heed the original calls to protests against Mr. Morsi but appears to have been influenced by the turnout.

The opposition umbrella group that has coordinated the protests, the June 30 Front, said on Tuesday that it had named Mohamed ElBaradei, a prominent Egyptian statesman and opposition leader, to represent the group in “any possible upcoming talks with the armed forces.” The group said its demands included Mr. Morsi’s departure and the formation of a technocratic cabinet to run the country.

Opposition activists called for new protests in front of the presidential palace on Tuesday evening, while a state of tense uncertainty gripped the country after the armed forces delivered an ultimatum on Monday giving Mr. Morsi 48 hours to reach an accommodation with the opposition.

Mr. Morsi’s supporters, too, renewed the calls for demonstrations to support the president and defend against what they said would amount to “a military coup.”

The crisis drew in President Obama, who spoke to Mr. Morsi by telephone on Monday from Tanzania, during the last stage of an African tour.

The standoff prompted other expressions of concern far beyond Egypt’s borders, with the United Nations high commissioner for human rights, Navi Pillay, urging all parties to engage in “a serious national dialogue in order to find a solution to the political crisis and prevent an escalation of violence” and calling on Mr. Morsi to “listen to the demands and wishes of the Egyptian people.”

Through a spokesman, Ms. Pillay also said Mr. Morsi should “heed the lessons of the past in this particularly fragile situation.”

In a military communiqué read over state television Monday that echoed the announcement toppling Mr. Mubarak two chaotic years ago, the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces demanded that Mr. Morsi satisfy the public’s demands within 48 hours or the generals would impose their own “road map” out of the crisis.

But instead of soothing the volatile standoff between Mr. Morsi’s opponents and his supporters, the generals seemed to add to the uncertainty that has paralyzed the state, decimated the economy and brought millions into the streets Sunday demanding that the president step down. It was not clear what the military meant when it said Mr. Morsi must satisfy the public’s demands, what it might do if that vague standard was not met, and who would be able to unite this badly fractured nation.

The generals did, however, open a new confrontation with Mr. Morsi’s allies in the Muslim Brotherhood with its threat to impose a political “road map.” Brotherhood members rallied in half a dozen cities to denounce the threat of a military takeover, a reminder that the group remains a potent force unwilling to give up the power it has waited 80 years to wield.

“We understand it as a military coup,” said one adviser to Mr. Morsi, speaking on the condition of anonymity to discuss confidential negotiations. “What form that will take remains to be seen.”

In a sternly worded statement issued after 1 a.m. Tuesday, moreover, Mr. Morsi’s office said it was continuing with its plans for dialogue and reconciliation with its opponents. Noting that it was not consulted before the military made its statement, Mr. Morsi’s office asserted, “Some of its phrases have connotations that may cause confusion in the complicated national scene,” and suggested that it “deepens the division between the people” and “may threaten the social peace no matter what the motivation.”

The delicate interplay between Mr. Morsi and the military’s top officer, Gen. Abdul-Fattah el-Sisi, was fraught with risks for both men, and for the nation. Faced with fuel shortages, dwindling hard currency reserves and worries about its wheat supplies, Egypt urgently needs a government stable and credible enough to manage difficult and disruptive economic reforms. A move by the military to force the Brotherhood from power, despite its electoral victories, could set off an Islamist backlash in the streets that would make stability and economic growth even more elusive.

According to a statement released by the White House as Mr. Obama visited Tanzania, he told Mr. Morsi, “The United States is committed to the democratic process in Egypt and does not support any single party or group.”

He stressed that “democracy is about more than elections,” the statement said, and encouraged Mr. Morsi to demonstrate “that he is responsive to the concerns of the protesters.” He underscored that the crisis “must be resolved through a political process.”

Mr. Morsi’s aides described Mr. Obama’s message as a confirmation that the White House was continuing to deal with Mr. Morsi as Egypt’s elected president and to support the country’s transition to civilian democracy.

On Monday, Mr. Obama had expressed concern about the protests but said the situation was different from earlier protests that had prompted the United States to call for the departure of Mr. Mubarak. “When I took a position that it was time for Egypt to transition, it was based on the fact that Egypt had not had democratic government for decades, if ever,” he said.

Now that Egypt has such a government, he said, “there’s more work to be done to create the condition where everybody believes their voices are heard.” He urged both sides to refrain from violence, and specifically mentioned reports of assaults on women in Egypt, saying, “Assaulting women does not qualify as peaceful protests.”

In Cairo, speaking to a crowd of Islamists armed with makeshift clubs and hard hats at a rally, a senior Brotherhood leader, Mohamed el-Beltagy, called on the crowd to defend Mr. Morsi’s “legitimacy” as the elected president. “No coup against legitimacy of any kind will pass except over our dead bodies,” he said, dismissing the latest protests as “remnants” of the Mubarak elite.

Across the Nile in Giza, Mohamed Fadala, a financial manager, said at a late-night rally for Mr. Morsi that General Sisi appeared to have considered only the non-Islamists in Egypt. “Sisi ignored half the people!”

The generals have shown little enthusiasm for returning to politics, especially after their own prestige was badly tarnished by the year of street violence and economic catastrophe they oversaw after ousting Mr. Mubarak. But as the protests against Mr. Morsi grew larger than those that pushed out Mr. Mubarak, it became clear that Mr. Morsi had lost the support of much of the population and had never fully controlled the security services or other institutions of the state.

Protesters faulted Mr. Morsi and his Brotherhood allies for what they called a rush to monopolize political power. In public squares that just a year ago echoed with chants demanding an end to military rule, cheers rose up again Monday welcoming the generals’ help in pressuring Mr. Morsi.

Citing “the historic circumstance,” the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces said in its statement Monday that “if the demands of the people have not been met” within 48 hours, then the generals would “announce a road map” to be enforced under the military’s supervision. But the generals insisted that under its auspices “all political factions” would participate in settling the crisis.

The “demands of the people” appeared to refer to the rallying cry of the wave of protests: a call for Mr. Morsi’s immediate departure. The generals, however, did not elaborate, leaving open the possibility that they might accept another power-sharing arrangement.

“The wasting of more time will only create more division and conflict,” the statement warned.

Still, the generals also wanted to disavow any eagerness to return to political power. “The armed forces will not be party to the circle of politics or ruling, and the military refuses to deviate from its assigned role in the original democratic vision,” the generals insisted.

As the Islamist pressure grew Monday night, the generals issued a second statement specifically denying that they were planning a military coup, saying their earlier statement was intended to “push all political parties in the nation to find solutions to the current crisis quickly.”

The Interior Ministry, whose police officers have been in open revolt against Mr. Morsi, issued its own statement endorsing the military’s intervention — another reminder of the breakdown in authority over the holdover institutions of the Mubarak government.

Egypt had been bracing for weeks for Sunday’s protests against Mr. Morsi on the anniversary of his inauguration. But the turnout surprised almost everyone: the crowds were far larger — running into the millions — and less violent than expected. The result not only underscored the depth of the animosity against Mr. Morsi but also dispelled Brotherhood arguments that a conspiracy of Mubarak “remnants” accounted for most of the opposition in the streets.

By Monday morning, however, clashes between Brotherhood supporters and opponents had left 15 dead across the country. Protesters attacked several Brotherhood offices. In Cairo a mob attacked the Brotherhood’s headquarters with Molotov cocktails, setting it on fire, breaking down its doors and looting the building.

The Health Ministry reported eight deaths outside the building, six from gunshots.

Protest organizers had given Mr. Morsi until Tuesday to resign and threatened a general strike. Protesters chained or blockaded government offices in 11 provinces. By evening, the crowds in several cities had grown to the hundreds of thousands again.

Many of the demonstrators now calling for Mr. Morsi’s ouster had spent months last year marching to demand that the military give up its hold on power, but when the military’s announcement was broadcast over the radio on Monday, cheers erupted.

Hassan Ismail, a local organizer, rejected any compromise that left Mr. Morsi in office and at the same time sought to distance his movement from its new military allies. “We don’t want to be against the army,” Mr. Ismail said. “And we don’t want the army to be against us.”

Mayy El Sheikh contributed reporting from Cairo; Michael D. Shear from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; and Alan Cowell from London.

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Napisano: 02 Jul 2013 23:11

4channer ::Морсију време истиче: Morsi Timer

He he he Smile. Kao da je docek Nove godine Smile

Mali off-topic (ako se moze nazvati tako): Kratak osvrt na Egipat i na njegov medjunarodni polozaj do danas.

Rusi imaju jedinstvenu priliku da povrate uticaj u Egiptu koji je prestao da bude od znacaja davne 1973. g. Tad je posle Oktobarskog rata glavnu ulogu u smirivanju sukoba izmedju Izraela i Egipta igrao Vasington. Kulminacija americkog uticaja ogleda se u egipatskom priznanju 1979. i dogovora u Kemp Dejvidu. Egipcani su tada zarad svojih nacionalnih interesa odbacili arapsko jedinstvo sa Sirijom. Egipat je povratio Sinaj dok Sirijci nisu dobili Golansku Visoravan. Od tada Sirija postaje No.1. u vodjenju arapskog otpora protiv cionista.

Egipat je prva arapska drzava koja je priznala Izrael, a 1994. g. Jordan je postalo druga arapska drzava koja ih je priznala. (Kuvajt priznaje izraelski pasos samo ako se radi o tranzitu).
Mubarak je dosao na vlast 1981. g. posle ubistva Anvara el-Sadata (ovaj je bio predsednik Egipta kada je priznat Izrael - 1970. nasledio je Nasera koji je bio pro-sovjetske orijentacije) i od tada je Egipat vezan u jos tesne odnose sa SAD.

Dopuna: 02 Jul 2013 23:14
Citat:
UŽIVO iz Egipta: Oružani sukobi u Kairu - najmanje 7 mrtvih

Prema informacijama egipatskih liječnika, najmanje 7 osoba je ubijeno za vrijeme sukoba između anti-vladinih prosvjednika i pristaša Muslimanske Braće. Liječnici ističu u razgovoru za AFP kako je velik broj ranjenih u gradskoj četvrti Giza, neki se nelaze u kritičnom stanju nakon zadobivenih prostrijelnih rana.

Stižu i informacije o ranjenim u industrijskom gradu Kafr Al-Dawar.

U isto vrijeme kako su se pojavile vijesti o rastućem broju mrtvih oglasio se i predsjednik Morsi. Prema posljednjim informacija trebao bi se uskoro obratiti javnosti te ponuditi "rješenje". Vijest je upravo objavila egipatska državna televizija.

11:10
Poruka iz Morsijevog ureda: "Oružane snage pozivaju se da povuku svoj ultimatum te se odbacuju svaka unutarnja i vanjska naređenja". Izgleda kako Morsi ne misli popustiti. Nakon ove poruke, koja je objavljena na Twitteru, s trga Tahrir prosvjednici su počeli uzvikivati "Odlazi! Odlazi!".



http://www.advance.hr/vijesti/uzivo-iz-egipta-oruz.....-7-mrtvih/

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Evo ga Hafezov govor iz 1982... Jes da su diktatori obojica al je tatko na Bašara bio odličan govornik, govori ki kad leči, Sloba mu nije ravan, samo poslušajte mislim da je ovaj prevod najbolji, mada ne razumem sirijski. Mr. Green

Uglavnom ove njegove reči i tri decenije kasnije odzvanjaju izgleda da ih je matori raskrinkao još tada za koga u stvari rade.

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Prošli put je krivac bio Mubarak , e sad kad zakuvaju trajaće ovo kao u Siriji , Mursi neće da se povuče iza njega stoje njegova braća , sad kad krene lavina neka im je Bog u pomoći.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DqCQMdfeQC8

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Gama ::Alexander Nevsky ::Za koga onda da navijam?

Za opoziciju da navijamo :-). Deluje mi da su oni spontano organizovani dok Ameri gase pozar. Ako oni krenu da dobijaju izgleda da ce Ameri kao po obicaju umesati prste. Ovo odgovara Cionistima jer tako ispada iz igre najjaca armija medju arapskim drzavama, a Izrael je siguran s juga i istoka dok mu je prodor na severu protiv Libana i Sirije otvoren.

Zasto ja NE navijam za Morsija:

-Muslimansko bratstvo je mutilo po Siriji i Egiptu u zadnjih tridesetak godina. Buna protiv Hafeza el-Asada 1979 - 82 o kojoj sam pricao vise puta.
-Dolazak na vlast MB (nije ono pivo Smile ) dovesce ekipu koja voli ljudske unutrasnje organe, a deca ce se uciti da kasape svoje oceve ako ovi pomenu Muhameda ili Alaha u negativnom svetlu.
-Morsi je prekinuo visedecenijske dobre odnose sa Sirijom u borbi protiv cionista - pus*y
-Egipat pod Morsijem je priznao Kosovo i Metohiju (26. juna 2013.)
-Muslimansko bratstvo napadalo Kopte (hriscane) po Egiptu koji cine skoro 10% stanovnistva.

Meni je ovo dovoljno za sada Smile

iako i ja imam lagane simpatije prema antimursi demonstrantima, ruku na srce sve ce to na kraju ostati isto. istina, demonstranti jesu relativno spontano organizovani, jesu vecina ali vodecu ulogu medju njima igra zapadni igrac Baradei. vjerujem da bi njihovom pobjedom manjine, odnosno sve skupine koje nisu miljenice islamista imale sigurnost i to je jedan od glavnih razloga podrske.
sve ostalo bi manje-vise ostalo isto. Egipcani bi novog Nasera ali ne ide. kao sto sam u ranijim postovima na ovoj temi pisao, izmedju tri zla moraju odabrati manje.

citam pucnjava u Egiptu, 7 mrtvih, dabogda da sve na dobro izadje. demonstrantima ne ide na ruku i cinjenica da je jedina stvar koja ih drzi na okupu budaletina Mursi, odnosno borba protiv njega. moguce podjele u vojsci dodatno kompliciraju situaciju.

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Levčanin ::Evo ga Hafezov govor iz 1982... Jes da su diktatori obojica al je tatko na Bašara bio odličan govornik, govori ki kad leči, Sloba mu nije ravan, samo poslušajte mislim da je ovaj prevod najbolji, mada ne razumem sirijski. Mr. Green

Uglavnom ove njegove reči i tri decenije kasnije odzvanjaju izgleda da ih je matori raskrinkao još tada za koga u stvari rade.



E to... to sam trazio... Hvala Smile.
Ima u originalu, crno-beli, bas to gde prica o ovima... u onom stilu: Tito u Splitu 1962 Smile.
Nasao sam ja ovaj snimak. Mislim da ga je lakse pratiti - ono sto kaze, to se prevede.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4IcmM5ha60

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