Maskirna uniforma vojnika

206

Maskirna uniforma vojnika

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  • MyCity Military Forum Chaplain~Verska služba Mycity foruma
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Vecini ljudi nije cilj da blate vs,vec da ukazu na toda vs ne vodi racuna o vizuelnom identitetu. nasa vojska ima najneuredjeniji vizuelni identitet. nije u pitanju m 03, vec 17 varijacija iste na dva vojnika uz dodatak 3 woodland varijacije kao navlake za slem, majce... naravno da ima bitnijih stvari, ali o tome postoje druge teme. a ovde ima ljudi kojima smeta sto nam vojska izgleda ko rusi u ceceniji ili kao neka pobunjenicka gerila. vs se mora potruditi da pa u pr svrhe vojska izgleda kao pod konac, jer sve one slike na sajtu vs izgledaju Jadno.



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  • jazbar 
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Estetika je stvar karakternog stanja pojedinca. Nekima je svejedno ako im je stan prljav, nesređen, neki vole da je sve u konac i čisto! Anarhija - kontra reda, kao jing i jang! Osobno sam na strani reda i protivim se tome da mi vojska izgleda jadno. Najvažnije su uniforme i osobna oprema svakog vojnika pa onda dalje prema prioritetu. Osim toga vrlo je važna unifikacija u vojski i to u svim vidovima jer umanjuje troškove i olakšava logistiku.



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Da li neko može reći nešto više o uniformi koju nosi Ratko Mladić dok je bio u VRSrpske. Ona uniforma je ostavila više nego jak utisak na mene i baš bih volio kad bi je i VS uzela u razmatranje. Pored n je me nebi zanimale ni multicam ni digital.
Nešto slično sam vidio samo u vojsci Grčke i Rusije čini mi se.

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Mislim da su se te uniforme radile po uzoru na Grcke,u VRS su ih i nazivali Grcka sara.Inace te uniforme su se u VRS korfistile mnogo prije M93,cak i u mnogo vecem broju.Uniforme M93 su se u VRS pojavile tek sredinom 1993. godine,a u masovnu upotrebu usle su poslije rata.

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VaRvArI 85 ::Da li neko može reći nešto više o uniformi koju nosi Ratko Mladić dok je bio u VRSrpske. Ona uniforma je ostavila više nego jak utisak na mene i baš bih volio kad bi je i VS uzela u razmatranje. Pored n je me nebi zanimale ni multicam ni digital.
Nešto slično sam vidio samo u vojsci Grčke i Rusije čini mi se.


@VaRvArI85
Pogledaj temu malo unazad, dosta smo pricali o toj uniformi.
Ukratko, to je bila borbena uniforma sa kojom je trebalo opremiti miliciju na saveznom i republickom nivou, zato i jeste bila toliko prisutna u Bosni.
U Makedoniji i dan danas se koristi kao borbena uniforma policije.
Inace razlikuje se dosta od grcke uniforme, a obe su nastale na osnovu francuske "Lizard" sare.

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Trpe i Misirac hvala na info, pogledaću kasnije temu ispočetka

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Army Cuts the Velcro

In a move that has the Web buzzing, the U.S. Army has decided to banish Velcro from uniform pants and bring back buttons.

Replacing the fastener on uniforms isn't your traditional front-page news, but the shift has captured the attention of many. A buzzy article from USA Today explains that soldiers told their superiors that the Velcro's stickiness was being affected by the sand of the Afghanistan desert. Pockets weren't staying shut.

The Army surved 2,700 soliders, and 60% of them said they would prefer buttons for their cargo pockets (only 11% wanted to "stick" with Velcro). Authorities listened, and now it looks like the old-fashioned button will be making a return.

The USA Today goes on to mention that the move back to buttons will end up saving the Army nearly $1 per uniform. There is at least one other huge benefit: Unlike Velcro, buttons don't make any noise. In times of conflict and danger, silence can be absolutely vital.

But don't feel too bad for Velcro. It isn't going away from the uniforms completely. It will still be on the sleeves, and under the soldier's nameplates.

Like Post-it Notes and other "Why didn't I think of that?" inventions, the hook and loop fastener has long captured the attention of Web searchers. Envious lookups for "velcro inventor" and "who invented velcro" are always popular in the Search box.

Here's the scoop. According to Idea Finder, Velcro was the creation of Swiss inventor George de Mestral. Back in 1948, he took a walk in the woods. Upon returning to his home, he noticed that a lot of burrs had attached themselves to his clothes. Eager to understand why, de Mestral examined the burrs under a microscope and saw how the tiny hooks on the burrs meshed with the loops of the fabric. From that stroll, a famous invention was born.

It took de Mestral many years to bring his idea to the masses. But he stuck with it, and eventually his baby changed the way NASA makes space suits and old people wear sneakers. The stuff is everywhere. Just not on certain areas of Army uniforms.

Sand drives Army to ditch Velcro on pants

WASHINGTON — The Army is ripping space-age Velcro from its uniforms and replacing it with the humble button, which turns out to be tailor-made for the rigors of Afghanistan.
Hook-and-pile tape — the generic term for Velcro— strains to keep jam-packed cargo pants pockets closed. And when the Taliban attacks, the last thing soldiers need to worry about is spilling their gear.


MILITARY: Fails on brain-test follow-ups
DEATH TOLL: A statistical, personal look at U.S. lives lost

Soldiers told superiors that Velcro didn't suit their needs, and the Army began testing alternatives last year, said Debi Dawson, an Army spokeswoman. In August, the Army will begin issuing new pants to soldiers heading to Afghanistan.

"When concerns surfaced in surveys that the hook-and-pile tape was not holding under the weight of full pocket loads, the Army evaluated several solutions," Dawson said. Velcro has been part of the latest Army combat uniform since it was introduced in 2004.

Dirt and rocks also clog the pile portion of the fastener. That requires soldiers to clean it regularly. An Army website offersthis helpful hint: a soldier's small weapons cleaning brush has been "working very well" in removing dirt and sand.

"This is the latest proof that dust and debris are the biggest enemy for the U.S. military," said Loren Thompson, a military analyst at the Lexington Institute and a consultant to defense contractors. "Taliban attacks come and go, but dust is constant in Afghanistan. Dust will impede the function of anything."

Sgt. Kenny Hatten cut to the heart of the matter in this posting on an Army website, urging the military to go back to the future:

"Get rid of the pocket flap Velcro and give us back our buttons," Hatten wrote. "Buttons are silent, easy to replace in the field, work just fine in the mud, do not clog up with dirt and do not fray and disintegrate with repeated laundering."

Somebody, apparently, was listening.

Snaps and buttons were identified as possible fixes for failing Velcro. The Army surveyed 2,700 soldiers who tested prototypes, and 60% said they preferred buttons and 29% liked snaps. Just 11% wanted to keep Velcro, according to the Army. In the end, the Army decided to substitute three buttons for Velcro on the cargo pockets of its pants.

It's cheaper, too. The Army will save 96 cents per uniform when it swaps buttons for Velcro, Dawson said.

The new-and-improved uniforms will still have plenty of Velcro, the sticky fabric popularized during spaceflights. (Astronauts used it to keep pens and other items from floating in the weightless environment.) Velcro remains on the cuffs of sleeves. It's also used for nameplates and patches.

Hatten's ideal uniform might save the Army a few more pennies.

"I don't mind the insignia Velcro on the sleeve pockets, but why would I need Velcro for my name tape and U.S. Army tapes?" he asked. "Am I going to change my name and join a different army? Why not let us sew these items on the uniform, along with the patrol cap? That's cheaper, more durable and reduces the possibility of having your uniform items stolen or tampered with."

The Army, Dawson said, hears soldiers like Hatten. It's aware of continuing complaints about Velcro and will take them into account when redesigning uniforms in the future.

@Usa today

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Dobar primer koliko USA vodi računa o uniformama.

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zgembo ::Army Cuts the Velcro

In a move that has the Web buzzing, the U.S. Army has decided to banish Velcro from uniform pants and bring back buttons.

Replacing the fastener on uniforms isn't your traditional front-page news, but the shift has captured the attention of many. A buzzy article from USA Today explains that soldiers told their superiors that the Velcro's stickiness was being affected by the sand of the Afghanistan desert. Pockets weren't staying shut.

The Army surved 2,700 soliders, and 60% of them said they would prefer buttons for their cargo pockets (only 11% wanted to "stick" with Velcro). Authorities listened, and now it looks like the old-fashioned button will be making a return.

The USA Today goes on to mention that the move back to buttons will end up saving the Army nearly $1 per uniform. There is at least one other huge benefit: Unlike Velcro, buttons don't make any noise. In times of conflict and danger, silence can be absolutely vital.

But don't feel too bad for Velcro. It isn't going away from the uniforms completely. It will still be on the sleeves, and under the soldier's nameplates.

Like Post-it Notes and other "Why didn't I think of that?" inventions, the hook and loop fastener has long captured the attention of Web searchers. Envious lookups for "velcro inventor" and "who invented velcro" are always popular in the Search box.

Here's the scoop. According to Idea Finder, Velcro was the creation of Swiss inventor George de Mestral. Back in 1948, he took a walk in the woods. Upon returning to his home, he noticed that a lot of burrs had attached themselves to his clothes. Eager to understand why, de Mestral examined the burrs under a microscope and saw how the tiny hooks on the burrs meshed with the loops of the fabric. From that stroll, a famous invention was born.

It took de Mestral many years to bring his idea to the masses. But he stuck with it, and eventually his baby changed the way NASA makes space suits and old people wear sneakers. The stuff is everywhere. Just not on certain areas of Army uniforms.

Sand drives Army to ditch Velcro on pants

WASHINGTON — The Army is ripping space-age Velcro from its uniforms and replacing it with the humble button, which turns out to be tailor-made for the rigors of Afghanistan.
Hook-and-pile tape — the generic term for Velcro— strains to keep jam-packed cargo pants pockets closed. And when the Taliban attacks, the last thing soldiers need to worry about is spilling their gear.


MILITARY: Fails on brain-test follow-ups
DEATH TOLL: A statistical, personal look at U.S. lives lost

Soldiers told superiors that Velcro didn't suit their needs, and the Army began testing alternatives last year, said Debi Dawson, an Army spokeswoman. In August, the Army will begin issuing new pants to soldiers heading to Afghanistan.

"When concerns surfaced in surveys that the hook-and-pile tape was not holding under the weight of full pocket loads, the Army evaluated several solutions," Dawson said. Velcro has been part of the latest Army combat uniform since it was introduced in 2004.

Dirt and rocks also clog the pile portion of the fastener. That requires soldiers to clean it regularly. An Army website offersthis helpful hint: a soldier's small weapons cleaning brush has been "working very well" in removing dirt and sand.

"This is the latest proof that dust and debris are the biggest enemy for the U.S. military," said Loren Thompson, a military analyst at the Lexington Institute and a consultant to defense contractors. "Taliban attacks come and go, but dust is constant in Afghanistan. Dust will impede the function of anything."

Sgt. Kenny Hatten cut to the heart of the matter in this posting on an Army website, urging the military to go back to the future:

"Get rid of the pocket flap Velcro and give us back our buttons," Hatten wrote. "Buttons are silent, easy to replace in the field, work just fine in the mud, do not clog up with dirt and do not fray and disintegrate with repeated laundering."

Somebody, apparently, was listening.

Snaps and buttons were identified as possible fixes for failing Velcro. The Army surveyed 2,700 soldiers who tested prototypes, and 60% said they preferred buttons and 29% liked snaps. Just 11% wanted to keep Velcro, according to the Army. In the end, the Army decided to substitute three buttons for Velcro on the cargo pockets of its pants.

It's cheaper, too. The Army will save 96 cents per uniform when it swaps buttons for Velcro, Dawson said.

The new-and-improved uniforms will still have plenty of Velcro, the sticky fabric popularized during spaceflights. (Astronauts used it to keep pens and other items from floating in the weightless environment.) Velcro remains on the cuffs of sleeves. It's also used for nameplates and patches.

Hatten's ideal uniform might save the Army a few more pennies.

"I don't mind the insignia Velcro on the sleeve pockets, but why would I need Velcro for my name tape and U.S. Army tapes?" he asked. "Am I going to change my name and join a different army? Why not let us sew these items on the uniform, along with the patrol cap? That's cheaper, more durable and reduces the possibility of having your uniform items stolen or tampered with."

The Army, Dawson said, hears soldiers like Hatten. It's aware of continuing complaints about Velcro and will take them into account when redesigning uniforms in the future.

@Usa today


U... to je već stara vest. Žižak je inače na džepove mogao da stavi ionako samo onaj krojač koji te hlače sam nikada nije ni probao.

+ mislim da original US hlače nisu 50% najlon 50% pamuk, već imaju mnogo složenije platno.

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Zna se kako se pravi Gore-Tex ili Simpatex, koje materiale, koji nacin i tehnika proizvodnje materijala itd...i taj materijal se koristi za uniforme. ne prave se uniforme od 50% pamuk 50% najlon.


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